May 2015 – Tree Planting (Part 4)

Continuing from part 3 of Tree Planting, we want to discuss the importance of planting your trees logically and smartly. Here is the continuation of those tips:

Use Stakes Smartly – Trees can be staked too tightly or for too long. Don’t stake small trees or those not in the wind’s path.

Large evergreen trees, planted in a windy site, will need staking. To stake,do not use garden hose and wire. Instead run wire through grommeted staking straps or use wide strips of carpeting. This way, the straps, not the wire, passes around the trunk. A year of staking usually is sufficient.

Rigid staking of a tree is counterproductive; research shows trees don’t develop normally if they’re not allowed any sway.

Mulch With Purpose – A forest tree provides its own mulch with several inches of leaves on the ground. We can imitate this by mulching the planting area with 3 to 4 inches of wood chips, chunk bark, straw, pine needles or shredded leaves. Don’t use plastic beneath the mulch; water or air can’t penetrate it. Fabric-type weed-barriers are preferable.

One thing you won’t see in the forest is manicured lawns around a tree. Research shows that newly planted trees are at a disadvantage when they must compete with grass for water, air and nutrients. Keep grass from the planting area for at least one year. If you mulch around trees, instead of planting grass, you also prevent possible trunk damage by lawn mowers or string trimmers.

Winter Is a Wrap – Use crepe paper or other wraps on your deciduous tree trunks about Thanksgiving time; remove the wraps around Easter. Do this for the first 2 to 3 seasons. This protects young trees from winter sunscald. If you’ve purchased a tree with the trunk wrapped, remove the material now; otherwise the wrap could harbor insects and diseases over the summer.

Continuing from part 3 of Tree Planting, we want to discuss the importance of planting your trees logically and smartly.  Here is the continuation of those tips:

Use Stakes Smartly – Trees can be staked too tightly or for too long. Don’t stake small trees or those not in the wind’s path.

Large evergreen trees, planted in a windy site, will need staking. To stake,do not use garden hose and wire. Instead run wire through grommeted staking straps or use wide strips of carpeting.  This way, the straps, not the wire, passes around the trunk. A year of staking usually is sufficient.

Rigid staking of a tree is counterproductive; research shows trees don’t develop normally if they’re not allowed any sway.

Mulch With Purpose – A forest tree provides its own mulch with several inches of leaves on the ground. We can imitate this by mulching the planting area with 3 to 4 inches of wood chips, chunk bark, straw, pine needles or shredded leaves. Don’t use plastic beneath the mulch; water or air can’t penetrate it. Fabric-type weed-barriers are preferable.

One thing you won’t see in the forest is manicured lawns around a tree. Research shows that newly planted trees are at a disadvantage when they must compete with grass for water, air and nutrients. Keep grass from the planting area for at least one year. If you mulch around trees, instead of planting grass, you also prevent possible trunk damage by lawn mowers or string trimmers.

Winter Is a Wrap – Use crepe paper or other wraps on your deciduous tree trunks about Thanksgiving time; remove the wraps around Easter. Do this for the first 2 to 3 seasons. This protects young trees from winter sunscald. If you’ve purchased a tree with the trunk wrapped, remove the material now; otherwise the wrap could harbor insects and diseases over the summer.

In Conclusion

Top Tree strives to earn your business.  In order to do that, we ensure the best practices that are consistent with optimal tree care, our arborists are properly trained, and our customer service is top notch.  If you are searching for a Tri-Cities tree maintenance company that is superior in every way, we would like to earn your business.

Scroll to Top

Contact Us

Free Estimates.
24/7 Emergency Service.

Your Name (required)

Your Email (required)

Your Message